Corporate Intelligence - Better Decisions

What is corporate intelligence and who needs it? Corporate intelligence is timely, relevant and up-to-date information about companies whom you deal with or plan to deal with. It can also include information about your competitors. Ignorance of relevant facts, or simply a lack of information can be costly for any organisation. Information purchased from credit reporting agencies can provide significant insight into past payment behaviour of a business entity, and may to an extent be able to predict the likelihood of any given customer defaulting on a payment or even going into liquidation. However it's important to be aware that such reports in no way provide a full and complete picture of any businesses solvency, and as such should never be exclusively relied upon when extending credit to a customer.

Credit history reports don’t provide a full and complete picture of a company’s solvency.

We can help you by obtaining for you the information and insight you need, when you need it, i.e. before making the most critical decisions. Armed with better information, you can proceed with confidence, knowing that you have been able to evaluate the risks and benefits from a more informed position.

Contact Us

Corporate Intelligence - Better Decisions

What is corporate intelligence and who needs it? Corporate intelligence is timely, relevant and up-to-date information about companies whom you deal with or plan to deal with. It can also include information about your competitors. Ignorance of relevant facts, or simply a lack of information can be costly for any organisation. Information purchased from credit reporting agencies can provide significant insight into past payment behaviour of a business entity, and may to an extent be able to predict the likelihood of any given customer defaulting on a payment or even going into liquidation. However it's important to be aware that such reports in no way provide a full and complete picture of any businesses solvency, and as such should never be exclusively relied upon when extending credit to a customer.

Credit history reports don’t provide a full and complete picture of a company’s solvency.

We can help you by obtaining for you the information and insight you need, when you need it, i.e. before making the most critical decisions. Armed with better information, you can proceed with confidence, knowing that you have been able to evaluate the risks and benefits from a more informed position.

Contact Us

Corporate Intelligence - Better Decisions

What is corporate intelligence and who needs it? Corporate intelligence is timely, relevant and up-to-date information about companies whom you deal with or plan to deal with. It can also include information about your competitors. Ignorance of relevant facts, or simply a lack of information can be costly for any organisation. Information purchased from credit reporting agencies can provide significant insight into past payment behaviour of a business entity, and may to an extent be able to predict the likelihood of any given customer defaulting on a payment or even going into liquidation. However it's important to be aware that such reports in no way provide a full and complete picture of any businesses solvency, and as such should never be exclusively relied upon when extending credit to a customer.

Credit history reports don’t provide a full and complete picture of a company’s solvency.

We can help you by obtaining for you the information and insight you need, when you need it, i.e. before making the most critical decisions. Armed with better information, you can proceed with confidence, knowing that you have been able to evaluate the risks and benefits from a more informed position.

Contact Us

Corporate Intelligence - Better Decisions

What is corporate intelligence and who needs it? Corporate intelligence is timely, relevant and up-to-date information about companies whom you deal with or plan to deal with. It can also include information about your competitors. Ignorance of relevant facts, or simply a lack of information can be costly for any organisation. Information purchased from credit reporting agencies can provide significant insight into past payment behaviour of a business entity, and may to an extent be able to predict the likelihood of any given customer defaulting on a payment or even going into liquidation. However it's important to be aware that such reports in no way provide a full and complete picture of any businesses solvency, and as such should never be exclusively relied upon when extending credit to a customer.

Credit history reports don’t provide a full and complete picture of a company’s solvency.

We can help you by obtaining for you the information and insight you need, when you need it, i.e. before making the most critical decisions. Armed with better information, you can proceed with confidence, knowing that you have been able to evaluate the risks and benefits from a more informed position.

Contact Us

Be informed, before...


Entering into a partnership, or considering a merger with another business.

Offering credit to a business, or extending existing credit limit or payment terms.

Commencing a formal or informal cooperation with a new business.

Proceeding with litigation for the purpose of recovering an overdue debt.

Be informed, before...


Entering into a partnership, or considering a merger with another business.

Offering credit to a business, or extending existing credit limit or payment terms.

Commencing a formal or informal cooperation with a new business.

Proceeding with litigation for the purpose of recovering an overdue debt.

To arrange a confidential meeting or telephone consultation, please submit your enquiry via the Contact Us form. All enquiries are dealt with in the strictest confidence.
To arrange a confidential meeting or telephone consultation, please submit your enquiry via the Contact Us form. All enquiries are dealt with in the strictest confidence.

Dealing with Companies

An ordinary Australian company is in effect a legal person, able to buy, sell, employ workers, and enter into contracts with people, as well as with other companies. The limited liability nature of a company gives protection to the company shareholders, in that (with few exceptions) creditors can only recover as much money from the company as the value of its assets. Should a company become insolvent, i.e unable to pay its debts, then the owners and directors of the company are generally able to liquidate the company, without personally being liable for the company's debts. This provides excellent protection for shareholders and directors of the insolvent company. Conversely however, it exposes the same company's creditors to a greater level of risk, not least the risk of supplying goods or services on credit to a company which is at high risk of becoming insolvent. Companies are not always what they are made out to be, so corporate intelligence services and further investigation may be warranted in order to gain more insight into a businesses financial position.

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Dealing with Companies

An ordinary Australian company is in effect a legal person, able to buy, sell, employ workers, and enter into contracts with people, as well as with other companies. The limited liability nature of a company gives protection to the company shareholders, in that (with few exceptions) creditors can only recover as much money from the company as the value of its assets. Should a company become insolvent, i.e unable to pay its debts, then the owners and directors of the company are generally able to liquidate the company, without personally being liable for the company's debts. This provides excellent protection for shareholders and directors of the insolvent company. Conversely however, it exposes the same company's creditors to a greater level of risk, not least the risk of supplying goods or services on credit to a company which is at high risk of becoming insolvent. Companies are not always what they are made out to be, so corporate intelligence services and further investigation may be warranted in order to gain more insight into a businesses financial position.


Directors Duties and Obligations

Company directors have a wide range of duties and powers which enable them to control the business. They are legally obligated to act in the best interest of the company's shareholders, and they are required to maintain appropriate oversight over the company's financial situation. Companies are required by ASIC to affirm annually that they are solvent - i.e. that the directors have determined that the company is in a position to pay its debts on time. But a director's duties goes much further than that. Directors are required to properly understand the company's financial position, with the obvious intention of ensuring that the company can continue to service its debts. However the reality is often very different, and companies may knowingly or unknowingly continue to purchase on credit while they have no realistic ability to repay what they owe.

Directors are required to properly understand the company’s financial position, with the intention of ensuring that the company can continue to service its debts.

Being Informed is Being Intelligent

While it's practically impossible to constantly and accurately evaluate the risk posed by a customer or by a competing business, there should be a close correlation between the level of risk exposure, and the level of insight you insist on obtaining. The more exposed your company is to risk from another business, the more information you need. Often, the level of risk exposure corresponds closely to the volume of business turnover that the company in question does as a customer of your business, though this may not always be the case. Our corporate intelligence service can provide you with with valuable insights into any company which potentially poses a risk to your business, and work in partnership with you to manage the risk on an ongoing basis. And if despite the best precautions, a debt owed to your company remains unpaid, as a professional and licensed Debt Collection Agency we can take swift action on your behalf in order to recover as much of the debt as possible as quickly as possible.

Need corporate intelligence, or help recovering a commercial debt? Submit a debt claim today!

Trading while insolvent is illegal, and preferential payments may be 'voidable' in a liquidation scenario. Typically, preferential payments (also known as preference payments) will include payments made or assets transferred from the struggling business, to a preferred creditor, with the result that other creditors end up with less. Any number of factors can contribute to a company's downfall - poor management decisions, health or other personal issues within the management ranks, internal fraud or theft within the company, prolonged litigation, and not least - the winding up of a company's own debtors. It's not uncommon for a company to go into liquidation owing multiple times what it owns, and this can have serious 'domino' effects as the insolvent company's creditors subsequently grapple with their own debts.

Directors Duties and Obligations

Company directors have a wide range of duties and powers which enable them to control the business. They are legally obligated to act in the best interest of the company's shareholders, and they are required to maintain appropriate oversight over the company's financial situation. Companies are required by ASIC to affirm annually that they are solvent - i.e. that the directors have determined that the company is in a position to pay its debts on time. But a director's duties goes much further than that. Directors are required to properly understand the company's financial position, with the obvious intention of ensuring that the company can continue to service its debts. However the reality is often very different, and companies may knowingly or unknowingly continue to purchase on credit while they have no realistic ability to repay what they owe.

Directors are required to properly understand the company's financial position, with the intention of ensuring that the company can continue to service its debts.

Trading while insolvent is illegal, and preferential payments may be 'voidable' in a liquidation scenario. Typically, preferential payments (also known as preference payments) will include payments made or assets transferred from the struggling business, to a preferred creditor, with the result that other creditors end up with less. Any number of factors can contribute to a company's downfall - poor management decisions, health or other personal issues within the management ranks, internal fraud or theft within the company, prolonged litigation, and not least - the winding up of a company's own debtors. It's not uncommon for a company to go into liquidation owing multiple times what it owns, and this can have serious 'domino' effects as the insolvent company's creditors subsequently grapple with their own debts.

Being Informed is Being Intelligent

While it's practically impossible to constantly and accurately evaluate the risk posed by a customer or by a competing business, there should be a close correlation between the level of risk exposure, and the level of insight you insist on obtaining. The more exposed your company is to risk from another business, the more information you need. Often, the level of risk exposure corresponds closely to the volume of business turnover that the company in question does as a customer of your business, though this may not always be the case. Our corporate intelligence service can provide you with with valuable insights into any company which potentially poses a risk to your business, and work in partnership with you to manage the risk on an ongoing basis. And if despite the best precautions, a debt owed to your company remains unpaid, as a professional and licensed Debt Collection Agency we can take swift action on your behalf in order to recover as much of the debt as possible as quickly as possible.

Need corporate intelligence, or help recovering a commercial debt? Submit a debt claim today!